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Hi, Edhutchins88! Thank you! I think we must make this...

10 hours 18 min ago
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Thank you, Kjcoffin!

10 hours 24 min ago
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Thank you, Lynette, for very useful comment!

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Thank you, Kjcoffin! I'll try to do what you said.

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Thank you, Kjcoffin! Seemingly obvious mistakes, but it'...

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News summary of March 22nd

As many South Koreans point fingers at China for the fine-dust problem South Korea is having, general director of the Global Green Growth Institute Frank Rijsberman has said it does not help lessening the amount of ultrafine dust, and a huge part of the toxic particles are actually produced at home. South Korea's air quality is measured to be at the bottom among 35 member states of the OECD. The Korean government estimates 80 percent of airborne particles under 2.5micrometers come from China when South Korea suffers the most. China denies such a claim as it has introduced drastic measures to lessen its air pollution problem, resulting in reducing one third of the pollutants, a study shows. The Korean government has taken drastic measures such as banning old diesel cars and conducting artificial rain experiments, but it is not enough, the Dutch director-general claimed in an interview done with Korea herald. Even though the Moon Jae-in administration has introduced a series of plans to switch from South Korea's coal-based economy to renewable energy-based, still coal is the most prevalent energy source in the country. The director-general said in the interview that Korea's cheap electricity price is hindering the implementation of such measures.

Original News Article: http://www.koreaherald.com/view.php?ud=20190320000600

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Grammatical Accuracy

The learners ability to use nouns, verbs, adjectives, etc. correctly in sentences, using verb tenses accurately, and having the correct agreement between subjects and predicates. For instance, one would say "they were" instead of "they was."

There are 3-4 grammatical errors
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There are 5 or more grammatical errors
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Punctuation

The learner's ability to use certain marks to clarify meaning of their writing by grouping words grammatically into sentences and clauses and phrases.

There are 3-4 errors in capitalization and punctuation.
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There are 5 or more errors in capitalization and punctuation.
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Spelling

The learners' ability to form words with the correct letters in the correct order

There are 3-4 spelling errors
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Style

The learner's ability to tailor the written work to fit the specific context, purpose, or audience

Mostly understandable. However, there are a few errors which cause confusion.
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Easy to understand. Writing flows and keeps reader engaged.
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Quite hard to understand.
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Aliakbar Majidi's picture
I learn : French (Beginner) Persian (Expert) Spanish (Beginner)
4813

Hi Bananap. Good job! I am impressed with your writing every time. The news is also interesting to me since I am interested in what is going on in other parts of the world. Regarding your text, here is a rewritten version:

 

As many South Koreans point fingers at China for the fine-dust problem South Korea is having, general director of the Global Green Growth Institute, Frank Rijsberman, has said it does not help lessen the amount of ultrafine dust, and a huge part of the toxic particles are actually produced at home. South Korea's air quality is measured to be the lowest among 35 member states of the OECD. The Korean government estimates 80 percent of airborne particles smaller than 2.5micrometers come from China and South Korea suffers the most. China denies such a claim as it has adopted drastic measures to lessen its air pollution problem, resulting in the reduction of one-third of the pollutants, a study shows. The Korean government has taken drastic measures such as banning old diesel cars and conducting artificial rain experiments, but it is not enough, the Dutch director-general claimed in an interview done with the Korean Herald. Even though Moon Jae-in administration has introduced a series of plans to switch from South Korea's coal-based economy to a renewable energy-based economy, coal is still the most prevalent energy source in the country. The director-general said in the interview that Korea's cheap electricity price is hindering the implementation of such measures.

Comment Rating : 
5
Average: 5 (1 vote)
kjcoffin's picture
I learn : Spanish (Intermediate)
1495

As many South Koreans point fingers at China for the fine-dust problem South Korea is having, general director of the Global Green Growth Institute Frank Rijsberman has said it does not help lessening the amount of ultrafine dust, and a huge part of the toxic particles are actually produced at home. South Korea's air quality is measured to be at the bottom among 35 member states of the OECD. The Korean government estimates 80 percent of airborne particles under 2.5micrometers come from China when South Korea suffers the most. China denies such a claim as it has introduced drastic measures to lessen its air pollution problem, resulting in reducing one third of the pollutants according to a study shows. The Korean government has taken drastic measures such as banning old diesel cars and conducting artificial rain experiments, but it is not enough according to the Dutch director-general claimed in an interview done with Korea herald. Even though the Moon Jae-in administration has introduced a series of plans to switch from South Korea's coal-based economy to that of renewable energy-based, still coal is still the most prevalent energy source in the country. The director-general said in the interview that Korea's cheap electricity price is hindering the implementation of such measures.

Good job again. Keep in mind that my corrections are simply fine-tuning to help with better flow of your writing. You clearly already have an advanced level of English which is great. Keep it up!

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5
Average: 5 (1 vote)
Karin Brauner's picture
I learn : French (Beginner)
1710

Very impressive! I'd have to be really picky to find any mistakes!

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5
Average: 5 (1 vote)
BeckyGreenBeans's picture
I learn : Spanish (Beginner)
4039

Hi! Thank you for this, it reads brilliantly, very informative!

Thanks,

Becky :)

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