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Aliakbar Majidi's picture

Hello again, GV. Good to know all that information Your...

Tuesday, June 18, 2019 - 23:27
Aliakbar Majidi's picture

Good job Anna! It is a bit sad to hear that your salary...

Tuesday, June 18, 2019 - 20:58
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Great effort, Morris! This is a wonderful and...

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Tuesday, June 18, 2019 - 20:44
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Tuesday, June 18, 2019 - 20:40

The Great British Summer

Summertime has always been my absolute favourite time of the year. When I was in school I just lived for the long summer holidays when I could play with my friends and my sister all day long until the sun set. Everyone has different associations of summer depending on where they live in the world or their childhood memories. For some, when they think of summer they think of the smell of freshly cut grass, for others it’s lying on a beach reading a book and for some it might be the taste of lemonade or ice cream. I am so happy to be spending this summer with my family and childhood friends here in the Highlands of Scotland after a year away in France. Even though many people complain about the weather here in Scotland even at this time of year, I can’t think of a better place to spend my summer holiday.

Undefined
Accent: 
5
Pronunciation: 
4.5
Intonation: 
5
Accuracy: 
5
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CategoryAdequate to goodGood to ExcellentNeeds work
Accent

The learner's ability to pronounce words shared by the people of a particular country or region of the language they are learning.

Good effort at accent. Quite close to that of a native speaker
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Excellent effort at accent. Extremely close to that of a native speaker.
People thought this
1
Limited effort at accent. Definitely a non-native speaker
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0
Fluency

The learner's ability to speak continuously by chunking and linking words together. For example, instead of saying very slowly, "I - am - poor. I - have - no - money" like a robot, a fluent speaker would say, "I'm poor because I don't have any money."

Speech is relatively smooth; some hesitation and unevenness caused by rephrasing and searching for words
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Smooth and fluid speech; few to no hesitations; no attempts to search for words; volume is excellent
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1
Speech is frequently hesitant with some sentences left uncompleted
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0
Intonation

The learner's ability to understand the relative emphasis that may be given to certain syllables in a word, or to certain words in a phrase or sentence

Able to identify and produce correct intonation, word stress and rhythm patterns with 50-90% accuracy.
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Able to identify and produce correct intonation, word stress and rhythm patterns with 90-100% accuracy.
People thought this
1
Able to identify and produce correct intonation, word stress and rhythm patterns with < 50% accuracy
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Pronunciation

The learners' ability to enunciate the various consonants, consonant blends, vowels, and vowel blends in words, words linked together, and words in sentences.

The pronunciation contained some individual word pronunciation errors. Around 3-4 errors
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The pronunciation is exceptional and mirrors a native speaker. Shows a clear understanding of word stress and intonation. Only 0-2 errors
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The pronunciation is inconsistent and made it difficult to understand. 5 or more errors
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edhutchins88's picture
I learn : Chinese (Beginner) French (Beginner) German (Beginner) Portuguese (Beginner) Spanish (Beginner) Arabic (Beginner)
4080

Fantastic Reading, Menahem. You speak English fluently (with a great American accent) and it is evident you are a very advanced learner. I am finding it very difficult to think of anything you can improve at ;-)

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edhutchins88's picture
I learn : Chinese (Beginner) French (Beginner) German (Beginner) Portuguese (Beginner) Spanish (Beginner) Arabic (Beginner)
4080

"could" -> /kʊd/ I am being very picky here indeed, put perhaps you could you with putting more emphasis on this word when you say it. (Note, this is simply my opinion and when you said "could" it was perfectly understandable)

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edhutchins88's picture
I learn : Chinese (Beginner) French (Beginner) German (Beginner) Portuguese (Beginner) Spanish (Beginner) Arabic (Beginner)
4080

"think" -> /θɪŋk/ Yet another word I am being very picky with. I just think you could put more stress on the "th" /θ/ sound when you say the word. (Yet again, this is simply my opinion and any native English speaker would understand you perfectly well)

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edhutchins88's picture
I learn : Chinese (Beginner) French (Beginner) German (Beginner) Portuguese (Beginner) Spanish (Beginner) Arabic (Beginner)
4080

lemonade /ˌlem.əˈneɪd/ -> You pronounced this word like this "limonade"

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edhutchins88's picture
I learn : Chinese (Beginner) French (Beginner) German (Beginner) Portuguese (Beginner) Spanish (Beginner) Arabic (Beginner)
4080

Highlands -> /ˈhaɪ.ləndz/ - With this word you just got the word stress slightly wrong. (But again, this is only a very minor detail)

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edhutchins88's picture
I learn : Chinese (Beginner) French (Beginner) German (Beginner) Portuguese (Beginner) Spanish (Beginner) Arabic (Beginner)
4080

Same case for this word -> Scotland /ˈskɒt.lənd/

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edhutchins88's picture
I learn : Chinese (Beginner) French (Beginner) German (Beginner) Portuguese (Beginner) Spanish (Beginner) Arabic (Beginner)
4080

Interesting observation: The word "Scotland" is pronounced a little differently in an American accent. /ˈskɑːt.lənd/. Here, I will do my best at imitating an American accent. (Though this may not be perfect, as I am used to speaking English with a British accent haha)

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Menahem's picture
I learn : English (Beginner)
0

Thanks a lot Edhutchins88! I really appreciate your observations. By the way, I didn't try to sound American, but since Brazilian schools usually adopt American English as their standard variation of English, that makes me sound kind of American, even when I don't intend to.

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edhutchins88's picture
I learn : Chinese (Beginner) French (Beginner) German (Beginner) Portuguese (Beginner) Spanish (Beginner) Arabic (Beginner)
4080

Glad to hear that, Menahem! On Lingora, I am sure that there will be plenty more discussions about the differences between American & British accents :-)

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Menahem's picture
I learn : English (Beginner)
0

To be honest, I think British English sounds better than American accent, but it would be more challenging for me to imitate it. But I'm going to study English in a British English school here, so I hope that will help me to develop my British accent!

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edhutchins88's picture
I learn : Chinese (Beginner) French (Beginner) German (Beginner) Portuguese (Beginner) Spanish (Beginner) Arabic (Beginner)
4080

Quite a few people say that the British accent sounds better - not sure why that is though. I am sure that you will develop a British accent in no time, as you are going to be studying in a British English school. And as I am a British person, I can also help you out with that ;-)

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Menahem's picture
I learn : English (Beginner)
0

That would be really helpful, since I have no British friends to practice my British accent. I only have a few American friends with whom I talk regularly on skype, but I'm already used to American accent :-)

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edhutchins88's picture
I learn : Chinese (Beginner) French (Beginner) German (Beginner) Portuguese (Beginner) Spanish (Beginner) Arabic (Beginner)
4080

Sounds great! Regarding your audios - I will do my best to show you the differences in accent / pronunciation etc between a British and an American accent. We can also speak whenever is convenient. Let me know when you have free time.

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Aliakbar Majidi's picture
I learn : French (Beginner) Persian (Expert) Spanish (Beginner)
4043

Hi, Mehahem. Ed is right, you speak English wonderfully. I just want to expand on the "th" articulation topic. To me, it seems as if you are pronouncing the sound like "f". Actually, the sound "th" is pronounced using the tongue and the teeth and it has two versions. One is voiced (/ð/) like the sound in "they", the other is unvoiced (/θ/) like the sound in "think". The difference between ð and θ can be compared to the difference between z and s; they are pronounced in the same place (place of articulation) with voiced-unvoiced features (manner of articulation). You can follow the following link to watch a video on how to pronounce the sounds correctly.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h5LO0hHGfQg

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