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Oleks's picture

Thank you, Faye! Your options is better.

5 hours 47 min ago
Oleks's picture

Thank you, Faye! I will try to do as you say.

6 hours 21 min ago
Oleks's picture

Hi Faye! Thank you for your link! You helped me a lot. I...

6 hours 22 min ago
Oleks's picture

Hi Ed! Thank you! No questions, you explained everything...

6 hours 24 min ago
Oleks's picture

Hi Ed! Thank you! I constantly forget about this nuance...

6 hours 27 min ago

Helping students with connected speech

(taken from a website)

There is a huge difference between what our students see printed on a page and what we actually say in everyday speech. 

 Teachers can tend to shy away from highlighting these in the classroom, but research shows that teaching learners about connected speech can really make a difference in terms of how well they understand native speakers. See for example, Authentic Communication: whyzit important ta teach reduced forms (Brown 2006) . Equally, some ability to use these features in their own speech will also be likely to make students more confident and fluent speakers.

Features of connected speech

As a brief overview, there is a strong tendency in English to simplify and link words together in the stream of speech, in order to help the language flow rhythmically. Some of the most common features: (I put just one)

Assimilation

This is when the sound at the end of one word changes to make it easier to say the next word. For example:

‘ten boys’ sounds like ‘ tem boys’ (the /n/ sound changes to the bilabial /m/ to make it easier to transition to the also bilabial /b/)

Incidentally bilabial just means two lips together, which is a good example of the kind of jargon that puts people off!

Undefined
Accent: 
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Pronunciation: 
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Intonation: 
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Accuracy: 
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CategoryAdequate to goodGood to ExcellentNeeds work
Accent

The learner's ability to pronounce words shared by the people of a particular country or region of the language they are learning.

Good effort at accent. Quite close to that of a native speaker
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Excellent effort at accent. Extremely close to that of a native speaker.
People thought this
2
Limited effort at accent. Definitely a non-native speaker
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Fluency

The learner's ability to speak continuously by chunking and linking words together. For example, instead of saying very slowly, "I - am - poor. I - have - no - money" like a robot, a fluent speaker would say, "I'm poor because I don't have any money."

Speech is relatively smooth; some hesitation and unevenness caused by rephrasing and searching for words
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Smooth and fluid speech; few to no hesitations; no attempts to search for words; volume is excellent
People thought this
1
Speech is frequently hesitant with some sentences left uncompleted
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Intonation

The learner's ability to understand the relative emphasis that may be given to certain syllables in a word, or to certain words in a phrase or sentence

Able to identify and produce correct intonation, word stress and rhythm patterns with 50-90% accuracy.
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Able to identify and produce correct intonation, word stress and rhythm patterns with 90-100% accuracy.
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2
Able to identify and produce correct intonation, word stress and rhythm patterns with < 50% accuracy
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Pronunciation

The learners' ability to enunciate the various consonants, consonant blends, vowels, and vowel blends in words, words linked together, and words in sentences.

The pronunciation contained some individual word pronunciation errors. Around 3-4 errors
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The pronunciation is exceptional and mirrors a native speaker. Shows a clear understanding of word stress and intonation. Only 0-2 errors
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1
The pronunciation is inconsistent and made it difficult to understand. 5 or more errors
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Faye W.C.'s picture
I learn : French (Beginner)
2449

Good job with reading the text. Your accent and fluency of your speech is good to understand.

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edhutchins88's picture
I learn : Chinese (Beginner) French (Beginner) German (Beginner) Portuguese (Beginner) Spanish (Beginner) Arabic (Beginner)
12515

I wish I had been taught about connected speech in the languages I learn. It is true that language teachers tend to shy away from it in the classroom and I think it is a real shame. Learning about connected speech in other languages makes them so much more interesting in my opinion!

Your spoken English is excellent and you hardly need any suggestions/advice concerning how you can improve further smiley. I only noticed that you could still do with improving your pronunciation of words that end in "on" like:

jargon and common
 

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