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Here is the recording which relates to my comment:

Sunday, February 18, 2018 - 03:13

Hi Luis.   I think you spoke quite fluently and with...

Sunday, February 18, 2018 - 03:11

Hi Aurelien.  Well done.  We need more from you!!  You...

Friday, February 16, 2018 - 23:18

Ok. Thank U!

Sunday, February 11, 2018 - 05:14

Of course ♥

Sunday, February 11, 2018 - 05:12

Morrisons are giving away FREE hot cross buns

Freshly baked Easter goodness for no money at all

Morrisons will be handing out free hot cross buns to every customer that enters any of its 491 stores across the UK today.

There's no catch, conditions or minimum spend, it's simply all in the name of kindness, with Morrisons hoping that customers who claim Friday's freebie "will pass it on to a neighbour or a loved one" and "re-connect".

Their infectious initiative follows research by the supermarket which found that 70 percent of Brits never talk to the people who live next door. Even worse, a staggering 86 percent claimed that they don't even know who lives on their street.

Guilty? Break the ice with Karen and Bill from next door by handing them over the freshly baked, individually wrapped treat, a.k.a the "Giving bun". Or invite them round to enjoy a whole pack with a nice cup of tea. Because when Brits partake in acts of kindness, they do it with tea and cake.

You won't need to buy anything to get your free Easter delicacy, but if you do fancy picking up a whole pack of the Easter treats, there seems to be a range of uniquely flavoured offerings from all the big supermarkets.

Aldi have brioche hot cross buns, Tesco have chocolate and fudge flavour while Asda have a free-from version .

If you're heading to Morrisons for yours and want to pick up a few extras, they've opted for sticky toffee and date plus apple and cinnamon flavours, as well as the usual culprits.

In keeping with their good deeds, Morrisons are also hosting a "Café Older Person event" on Saturday the 15th April at 2.30pm – 5.00pm, offering members of the public who over 60 years of age a free hot drink and a hot cross bun in Morrisons cafes nationwide.

source http://www.mirror.co.uk/money/morrisons-free-hot-cross-buns-10173437?ser...

Undefined
Accent: 
3.5
Pronunciation: 
3.5
Intonation: 
4
Accuracy: 
3.5
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CategoryAdequate to goodGood to ExcellentNeeds work
Accent

The learner's ability to pronounce words shared by the people of a particular country or region of the language they are learning.

Good effort at accent. Quite close to that of a native speaker
People thought this
1
Excellent effort at accent. Extremely close to that of a native speaker.
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Limited effort at accent. Definitely a non-native speaker
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Fluency

The learner's ability to speak continuously by chunking and linking words together. For example, instead of saying very slowly, "I - am - poor. I - have - no - money" like a robot, a fluent speaker would say, "I'm poor because I don't have any money."

Speech is relatively smooth; some hesitation and unevenness caused by rephrasing and searching for words
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Smooth and fluid speech; few to no hesitations; no attempts to search for words; volume is excellent
People thought this
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Speech is frequently hesitant with some sentences left uncompleted
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Intonation

The learner's ability to understand the relative emphasis that may be given to certain syllables in a word, or to certain words in a phrase or sentence

Able to identify and produce correct intonation, word stress and rhythm patterns with 50-90% accuracy.
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Able to identify and produce correct intonation, word stress and rhythm patterns with 90-100% accuracy.
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Able to identify and produce correct intonation, word stress and rhythm patterns with < 50% accuracy
People thought this
1
Pronunciation

The learners' ability to enunciate the various consonants, consonant blends, vowels, and vowel blends in words, words linked together, and words in sentences.

The pronunciation contained some individual word pronunciation errors. Around 3-4 errors
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The pronunciation is exceptional and mirrors a native speaker. Shows a clear understanding of word stress and intonation. Only 0-2 errors
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The pronunciation is inconsistent and made it difficult to understand. 5 or more errors
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edmundHutchings's picture
I learn : English (Beginner) French (Beginner) Portuguese (Beginner) Spanish (Beginner)
0

Excellent work Kayque. Your level of English is excellent. You speak fluently, confidently and clearly. I have found a few things you need to work on, though there are not that many. Good job!

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edmundHutchings's picture
I learn : English (Beginner) French (Beginner) Portuguese (Beginner) Spanish (Beginner)
0

"baked" With this word you pronounced it like this "BAK-ED" emphasising the "ed" sound at the end of the word too much . It should sound more like this "BAK-DT" Listen to me saying it a few times and try and imitate me.

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edmundHutchings's picture
I learn : English (Beginner) French (Beginner) Portuguese (Beginner) Spanish (Beginner)
0

"stores" similar situation with this word. You emphasised the "ed" sound too much at the end of the word. It should sound like this "sto-hrzz "

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edmundHutchings's picture
I learn : English (Beginner) French (Beginner) Portuguese (Beginner) Spanish (Beginner)
0

"neighbour" [NEY-BER] -

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edmundHutchings's picture
I learn : English (Beginner) French (Beginner) Portuguese (Beginner) Spanish (Beginner)
0

"staggering" [stag-uh-ring]

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edmundHutchings's picture
I learn : English (Beginner) French (Beginner) Portuguese (Beginner) Spanish (Beginner)
0

"baked" "claimed". I feel you could do with particularly working on your pronunciation of past simple tense and past participle regular verbs which all end in -ed-. Take a look at this link here:
https://www.englishclub.com/pronunciation/-ed.htm

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edmundHutchings's picture
I learn : English (Beginner) French (Beginner) Portuguese (Beginner) Spanish (Beginner)
0

"fudge" [fuhj]

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edmundHutchings's picture
I learn : English (Beginner) French (Beginner) Portuguese (Beginner) Spanish (Beginner)
0

2.30pm – 5.00pm - With dates, we can either say it like this "from half-past two to five o'clock" or more simply, we can say "2.30pm to 5pm".

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Ros Watson's picture
I learn : Italian (Beginner) French (Beginner)
273

Hi Kayque

This is very good.  I agree with Edmund that you speak fluently and clearly.   A little work on stress and intonation would make it even clearer.  I have attached my recording for reference.  Don't worry - everyone does this at first but... when we use regular verbs in the past tense and add "ed" we only need to pronounce the "ed" as a second syllable IF the base verb ends in "d" or "t".  So "baked" is just spoken as one syllable with the "ed" at the end pronounced as "t".   Now - compare this with the word "wanted".  The base verb "want" ends in a "t" so we have to add the "ed" sound as a second syllable.  

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